Gods Book

Amaterasu-omikami

Upcoming book release “There's a god for that”

Publication date: October 2012

Narrative Nonfiction

Japan

Shinto

Prayers

Mythological Gods

Ghosts

Demons

Spirits

Mythical gods; place-based gods; mystic messengers; supernatural beings; martyrs and saints; and the spirits of ancestors who have long since crossed over.

TITLE

There’s a God for That

SUBTITLE

Optimism in the Face of Earthquakes, Tsunamis and Meltdowns

AUTHOR

Joseph Honton

PUBLISHER

Frankalmoigne, Sebastopol

GENRE

Narrative nonfiction

BOOKSTORE SUBJECTS

TRAVEL / Asia / Japan

RELIGION / Shintoism

POLITICAL SCIENCE / Peace

CATALOGING-IN-PUBLICATION

1. Japan – Religious life and customs

2. Earthquakes – Japan

3. Tsunamis – Japan

4. Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (Japan) Accidents

5. Antinuclear movement

6. Ghost stories, Japanese

NOVELIST APPEAL

STORYLINE: Issue-oriented

PACE: Relaxed

TONE: Moving; Reflective

WRITING: Lyrical; Thoughtful; Richly detailed; Stylistically complex

PAGES / WORDS

xvi, 168pp, glossary

40,000 words

MAPS / ILLUSTRATIONS

12 maps, 2 line drawings

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CONTROL NUMBER

2012940666

ISBN

978-0-9856423-0-3 (hardcover)

978-0-9856423-1-0 (pbk.)

978-0-9856423-2-7 (eBook)

978-0-9856423-3-4 (Kindle)

PRICE

US $28.00 (hardcover)

US $16.00 (pbk.)

US $11.99 (eBook)

US $9.99 (Kindle)

AVAILABLE FROM

Wholesale: Ingram

Retail: Frankalmoigne

PUBLICATION DATE

October 2012

The Japanese have a god for Everything

Japan has a uniquely religious way of life, a life filled with the blessings of the gods – not one omnipotent creator, protector, benefactor, exemplar, adjudicator.

Instead, Japanese kami take many forms: mythical gods that explain the order of the universe; place-based gods that inhabit mountains and groves and lakes and seas; ancient trees venerated as the earthly abode of heavenly visitors; mystic messengers in animal form; supernatural beings in the guise of ghosts and demons; martyrs and saints that become gods by example; and the spirits of ancestors who have long since crossed over.

Some say this country has a god for everything, and after a while you begin to agree.

Amaterasu-ōmikami
The goddess of the sun, and ancestral deity of the imperial family. She is the most important kami in the Shinto pantheon. She is the sister of Tsukuyomi and Susanō.
Ame-no-uzume
The goddess of sensuality and revelry. Because of her role in enticing the sun goddess to reveal herself, she is also considered the goddess of dawn.
Benzaiten
The water goddess and patroness of learning, art, music, poetry, rhetoric, eloquence, and all “things that flow.” She is originally a Buddhist goddess, but she has been adopted into the Shinto pantheon under the name Itsukushima-hime.
Ebisu
The god of good fortune, and is the patron of fishermen and workmen. He is known as the laughing god.
Konohana-no-sakuya-hime
The goddess of Mount Fuji, which is the spiritual symbol of the nation. Her name is an allusion to the ephemeral beauty of the cherry blossom.
Ōkuninushi-no-mikoto
The original ruler of Earth, but when Ninigi was sent to replace him, Ōkuninushi was made ruler of the unseen world. He is the patron of good fortune and good marital relationships.
Susanō-no-mikoto
The Ferocious Virulent Male God, patron of the summer storm. He is the brother of Tsukuyomi and Amaterasu.
Tsukuyomi-no-mikoto
The god of the moon. He is the brother of Amaterasu and Susanō.

ame no uzume gods book

Other new book releases by the same publisher: ame no uzume gods book.

This page last updated on Friday August 19, 2016.